FAQ

Product Questions:
1. How do I find code number of machine/product?
2. How do I store a helmet?
3. How do I reassemble the headgear?
4. How do I figure out what type of equipment I need?
5. What is ANSI and should I see it printed on my lens?
6. What do the markings on my lens mean?
7. What does ASIC mean?
8. Does ArcOne® do custom logos?

Lens/Filter Questions:
1. How does the iDF81 work?
2. What does it mean when the lens is flickering while I am welding?
3. What are the dark spots in my filter?
4. What if there is a crack in my lens?
5. What if I have stopped welding and the lens stays dark?
6. What if my lens will not turn dark?
7. Why does my lens appear lighter at the top and/or bottom while welding?
8. Why is my lens slow to darken?
9. I left my lens in the sun to charge and it still does not work.
10. Which direction should the solar panel face (inward or outward) to charge the lens?
11. I've had my lens for 10 years and it just stopped working.
12. How do I change the batteries?
13. Where is the serial number?
14. The 6000VI4 lens does not respond, even when I changed the battery.
15. How can I repair my lens? Can my lens be repaired?

Product questions:


1. How do I find code number of machine/product?


  • Serial Numbers on ADF’s: typically on narrow edge of lens case, edge depends on model & we are in the process of having the serial number added to the inside of welding helmets near the warning label(s).

  • Serial Numbers on Inverters: located on the bottom of the unit

  • Lot Numbers on PAPR or SAR: located on or near product information label, where applicable; e.g. Lot# 25000

  • Part Number on Helmets: usually indicated on the box. If the helmet is for a respiratory product, it will have a part number on the airduct.


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2. How do I store a helmet?

  • Away from heat or moisture. Storage temperature should not exceed 120°F (Store between 14°F and 120°F)

  • In original packaging or similar

  • Respiratory units come with a duffle bag- large enough to hold PAPR and helmet

  • In a location where it will not be subject to falling or impact


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3. How do I reassemble the headgear?

  • Make sure you have all the applicable hardware: 2 bolts, 2 knobs, 1 pivot stop

  • Set the headgear in the helmet such that the front headband is toward the front and the ratchet is pointing outward.

  • Right side: put 1 bolt through the hole in the headgear, line up the pivot stop such that the hole is around the square boss of the bold and the pin can go into one of the small holes in the helmet, insert this
    assembly through the square slot on the helmet such that the pivot stop is in place and the square boss of the bolt is parallel with the square slot on the helmet; secure with the nut (do not over tighten).

  • Left side: as above however, there is not a pivot stop


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4. How do I figure out what type of equipment I need?

  • You should always confer with the job site safety manager and/or Industrial Hygienist.

  • Also may consult OSHA.

  • Consider personal comfort – depending on the individual, he/she may prefer a darker or lighter lens- UV/IR protection is there regardless of the shade setting of the lens.


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5. What is ANSI and should I see it printed on my lens?

    ANSI is an abbreviation for The American National Standards Institute. The lenses are marked in accordance with the specific standard tested. In the case of welding filters, they are marked AR W Z87, where AR is our manufacturer’s mark, W indicates welding lens, and Z87 is the name of the standard for eye protectors. Note: depending on which year the lens was tested, the W may or may not be present.

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6. What do the markings on my lens mean?

    Example of marking on the top or bottom narrow edge of your lens:
    AR W Z87 4/9-13 MODEL 1000FCF SERIAL NO. EJ0313000469

    AR = ArcOne’s manufacturing mark
    W = Welding filter (may or may not be indicated in markings)
    Z87 = ANSI standard for eye protectors
    4/9-13 = the shade range(s) for the auto-darkening lens. (4 = the Light State shade, 9-13 = the range for Dark State shades. Some lenses may have only one Dark State shade.)
    MODEL 1000FCF = the model number of the lens, varies according to model
    SERIAL No. EJ0313000469 = the serial number of the lens. May contain a combination of letters and numbers. Each model has a unique letter designation at the start of the serial number. EJ is specific to the 1000FCF.

    Example of markings on the back of your lens:
    Z87 CAN/CSA Z94.3 COLTS LABS 0530 CE 4/9-13 AR 1/1/1/2 / 379

    Z87 = ANSI standard for eye protectors
    CAN/CSA Z943.3 = The Canadian Standard for eye protectors
    COLTS LABS = Certified Lab for CSA
    0530 = Authorizing Body Number for the approval of CE (European Standard); varies depending on organization who granted approval
    CE = European Mark
    4/9-13 = the shade range(s) for the auto-darkening lens. (4 = the Light State shade; 9-13 = the range for Dark State shades. Some lenses may have only one Dark State shade.)
    AR = ArcOne’s manufacturing mark
    1 = Optical Class
    1 = Diffusion of light class
    1 = Diffusion of light class
    2 = Angle Dependency Class (new designation, may or may not be present in the markings)
    EN 379 = European Standard for auto-darkening welding filters

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7. What does ASIC mean?

  • Application Specific Integrated Circuit.

  • Reduces the number components on the board, allows for digital performance.


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8. Does ArcOne® do custom logos?

  • Yes, we are able to do custom logos. Please call for a quote.



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Lens/Filter Questions:

1. How does the iDF81 work?

  • Refer to the Mr.Tig video.


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2. What does it mean when the lens is flickering while I am welding?

  • The sensors are not detecting the arc. This could be due to several reasons:

    • Cover plate is dirty or sensors are dirty

    • Object is obstructing the path of the light from the arc to the sensors; e.g. holding the welding torch in such a manner the torch is between the arc and the sensors. Another example would be pipe welding, welding around the pipe but keeping the view to the helmet stationary.

    • Angle is too great between the arc and the sensors. Welder should try to view the arc at a 90° angle as much as possible

    • Overhead welding – ArcOne helmets are not designed for overhead welding

    • Low amperage welding – the light emitted from the arc is not strong enough to be detected by the sensors. Detection varies by model, 5 to 40 Amps for TIG welding.

    • Solar panel is broken or dirty – lens is not getting enough power to function correctly



  • Solutions for flickering lens:

    • Clean the lens

    • Clean or replace the cover plate

    • Clean the solar panel (if the solar panel is cracked, do not use the lens; only option is to replace the lens – have Tech Support evaluate)

    • Increase the sensitivity on the ADF

    • Have the welder position him/herself such that the lens is closer to the arc and the front surface is at a 90° angle

    • Remove any obstructions

    • If pipe welding – increase the sensitivity & the delay (longer delay will help keep the lens dark). Tip: A mirror can be used to see the other side of the pipe or object and help reflect back the light of the arc to the sensors.



  • If the lens is flickering while not welding:

    • Sensor is detecting a bright light source or arc (check for other welders in the area and overhead lighting) –turn down sensitivity

    • Some models come with a replaceable battery (6000VI4 and IDF models) – replace battery when necessary. IDF models display a low battery symbol when the battery needs to be replaced.

    • If none of the conditions exist or none of the solutions resolve the issue, contact Technical Support to return lens for an evaluation.




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3. What are the dark spots in my filter?

    Dark spots are most likely the cause of a crack –internal or external. The filter is comprised of layers of liquid crystals between glass plates. When there is a crack in the glass, air may get into the lens and “push” some of the crystals out of location. This can result in either a permanent dark spot or light spot.

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4. What if there is a crack in my lens?

    Typically, cracks are due to some sort of impact. In such a case the warranty is voided and the only option is to replace the lens. If the cause of the crack is uncertain, contact Technical Support for an evaluation.

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5. What if I have stopped welding and the lens stays dark?

  • Check the delay setting on the filter, increase to remain dark for a few seconds after welding; decrease to switch back to light state immediately after stopping arc.

  • If the lens stays dark long after stopping the arc, check to see if ambient light or arc welding from nearby welders is keeping lens dark – you may need to decrease your sensitivity.

  • Block the sensors temporarily to interrupt any light source – lens should return to light state.

  • Lens may stay dark if subjected to intense heat – allow lens to cool until it reaches light state.

  • If no solution works, return lens to Technical Support for evaluation.


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6. What if my lens will not turn dark?

  • Make sure lens is not in the Grind Mode – none of the functions will work while in Grind Mode. The 6000VI4 is the only lens with a power button; all other lenses should turn dark upon detection of the arc.

  • If the lens is powered by a replaceable battery (6000VI4 or IDF model), replace the battery.

  • Increase the sensitivity.

  • Always check the lens prior to welding by directing toward a bright light source (note, the sun is not a sufficient source), or use a remote control (directed at a sensor) to make sure lens will darken. Do not
    weld with lens if it does not darken. Contact Technical Support for evaluation.


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7. Why does my lens appear lighter at the top and/or bottom while welding?

  • This is a condition called Angle Dependency, and is common with many auto-darkening filters.

  • If you look at a passive filter at an angle, it appears darker as you are looking through a thicker cross section. An auto-darkening filter has the opposite effect; it appears to be lighter if you look through it at an angle. The technical term that describes this observation is angle dependency. We like to describe this observation as the venetian blind effect. When you close a venetian blind it reduces the light coming through the window, but if you look through the blinds at an angle parallel to the blinds it appears lighter. This same thing occurs in an auto-darkening filter, as they are similar in function. The liquid crystal in the LCD has elongated molecules that lay parallel to each other (see Figure 1). As they rotate to a closed position, when energized, the amount of light that passes through the filter is reduced (see Figure 2). When you look through the filter at 90 degrees to the filter surface, you will experience the darkest shade. If viewed at an angle less than 90 degrees the shading appears lighter. You are experiencing the venetian blind effect otherwise known as angle dependency.



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8. Why is my lens slow to darken?

  • Cold temperatures may delay the lens reaction time. Do not store the lens in temperatures below 14°F.

  • ArcOne auto-darkening lenses are designed to operate on low voltage. If the filter has not been used for a long time, and especially if it has been kept in dark conditions, the circuitry will enter a sleep state. Direct the lens toward a bright light source to ensure it will go dark before welding.

  • If the lens has been in storage, the lens may appear to slowly transition toward the desired shade. For instance, the lens may be set to shade 10, but initially appear as shade 8 and settle at shade 10. Once energized, the lens will go directly to shade 10 each time an arc is struck.

  • As long as the helmet with an auto-darkening filter is worn correctly, you are protected from UV/IR rays regardless of the shade of the lens.


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9. I left the lens in the sun to charge and it still does not work.

  • The sun is not a sufficient light source to activate your lens. If the lens had not been used for a long time and is in sleep mode, then it can be "wakened" by exposing the solar panel to an incandescent bulb.

  • Test the lens to make sure it operates by holding in front of an incandescent bulb or use a remote control pointed at one of the sensors to trigger the lens.


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10. Which direction should the solar panel face (inward or outward) to charge the lens?

  • The solar panel must always face out so that the welding arc can activate the lens. The lens will not turn dark if the solar panel is facing down.

  • In some instances you may find turning the lens upside down allows the lens to function better. As long as the solar panel and all sensors are exposed to the arc, the lens will turn dark.


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General welding questions:

11. How I’ve had my lens for 10 years and it just stopped working.

    Depending on the amount of use, the life span of the lens is about 7-10 years. Replacement is recommended.

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12. How do I change the batteries?

  • Most ArcOne lenses do not come with replaceable batteries. While the lenses do hold back-up batteries for the solar panel, they are hard-wired in and do not require replacement.

  • For models that do not have replacement batteries, the battery is housed behind the Shade and Sensitivity knobs. The case should slide open for easy replacement.


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13. Where is the serial number?

  • The serial number is located on the narrow edge of the lens. Lenses manufactured after 2006 will have a 1 or 2 letter designation followed by a 10 digit number. Some serial numbers end in the letters NW.

  • Example for a 1000FCF, the serial number EJ##########; for Singles shade 11 the serial number is B##########NW.


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14. The 6000VI4 lens does not respond, even when I changed the battery.

  • Please turn the battery over, and the lens will work.

  • This lens is operated by a coin battery. If not installed properly, the lens will not function. Pull the battery hosing open and flip the battery over. Be sure to press the “ON” button and test the lens with a bright light source to ensure proper function prior to welding.


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15. How can I repair my lens? Can my lens be repaired?

  • ArcOne lenses are not user serviceable.

  • Return defective lenses to Technical Support for evaluation. Lenses with a confirm defect will be replaced.


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